What You Need To Know

Trondheim historically Kaupangen, Nidaros and Trondhjem, is a city and municipality in Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. It is the third largest city in the country. The city functions as the administrative centre of Sør-Trøndelag County. Trondheim lies on the south shore of the Trondheimsfjord at the mouth of the river Nidelva. The city is dominated by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), the Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research (SINTEF), St. Olavs University Hospital and other technology-oriented institutions.

The settlement was founded in 997 as a trading post, and it served as the capital of Norway during the Viking Age until 1217. From 1152 to 1537, the city was the seat of the Catholic Archdiocese of Nidaros; since then, it has remained the seat of the Lutheran Diocese of Nidaros and the Nidaros Cathedral. It was incorporated in 1838. The current municipality dates from 1964, when Trondheim merged with Byneset, Leinstrand, Strinda and Tiller.

Area: 132.2 mi²
Population: 178,021 (2012)

Currency

The unit of currency in Norway is the krone (plural: kroner), which translates as “crown,” written officially as NOK. Price tags are seldom marked this way, but instead read “Kr” followed by the amount, such as Kr 10 or 10 Kr.

The Norwegian currency is the krone (plural: kroner), written as NOK. There are 100 øre in 1 krone. Bank notes are issued in denominations of 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 kroner. Coins are issued in denominations of 50 øre, 1 krone, and 5, 10, and 20 kroner.

Climate

  • Trondheim has a subarctic climate that has severe winters, no dry season, with cool, short summers and strong seasonality (Köppen-Geiger classification: Dfc).
  • In the winter time records indicate temperatures by day reach 0°C (32°F) on average falling to -4.7°C (23.6°F) overnight.
  • During summer average high temperatures are 17°C (62.6°F) and average low temperatures are 9.7°C (49.4°F).
  • On average there are 1346 hours of sunshine per year.

Language

  • The most widely spoken language in Norway is Norwegian. It is a North Germanic language, closely related to Swedish and Danish, all linguistic descendants of Old Norse. Norwegian is used by some 95% of the population as a first language.
  • English is also widely spoken

Safety

Generally considered to be the sort of city where little old ladies can walk safely in dark alleys. It is also not terribly uncommon that regular people will go to great strides to give you back your wallet if you drop it, with cash and credit cards intact.

The only “danger” you might encounter are the occasional youths stumbling around in large groups on Friday/Saturdays. The same goes for Trondheim as anywhere else; leave drunk people alone and it’s a good chance they’ll leave you alone as well.

There are some beggars and rough people. Norway has an extensive social wellfare system, and everyone is guaranteed a place to live and a minimum hand out from the government (for single person aprox 5000 NOK a month). Beggars are therefore usually people whose economical difficulties are related to excessive use of drugs or alcohol. In the summer, you might also encounter foreigners who have travelled to Norway on the purpose of begging for money. Begging is not illegal in Norway.

Getting Around

Trondheim has a well-developed bus network, covering nearly all of the city.

One tram  line operates from St. Olavs gate near the centre to Lian, up in the Bymarka forests. It operates on the same fare schedule, so day passes are valid. The tram is the nothernmost tram service in the world.

Local trains can also be used within the city boundaries (between stations Rotvoll and Lerkendal/Heimdal). Sadly, these are no longer part of the common public transport fare system, so day passes are not valid. Buy single tickets from the station clerks or the conductor on the train.

Education

Trondheim is home to both the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) with its many technical lab facilities and disciplines, and BI-Trondheim, a satellite campus for the Norwegian Business School (BI).

St. Olavs University Hospital, a regional hospital for Central Norway, is located in downtown Trondheim. St. Olavs is a teaching hospital and cooperates closely with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) on both research and medical education.

SINTEF, the largest independent research organisation in Scandinavia, has 1800 employees with 1300 of these located in Trondheim. The Air Force Academy of the Royal Norwegian Air Force is located at Kuhaugen in Trondheim.

The Geological Survey of Norway is located at Lade in Trondheim and is a major geoscientific institution with 220 employees of which 70% are scientists.

There are 11 high schools in the city. Trondheim katedralskole (“Trondheim Cathedral School”) was founded in 1152 and is the oldest upper secondary school (gymnasium) in Norway, while Brundalen videregående skole is the largest in Sør-Trøndelag with its 1100 students and 275 employees. Brundalen Skole, has big festivals each year, and is building out to increase space.

Ila skole was founded in 1770 and is the oldest primary school in Trondheim.

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